Embodied Spirituality: Storytelling

"The Boyhood of Raleigh" by John Everett Millais - Transferred from en.wikipedia; transfer was stated to be made by User:Mattis. Original uploader was Rednblu. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Millais_Boyhood_of_Raleigh.jpg#/media/File:Millais_Boyhood_of_Raleigh.jpg

The Boyhood of Raleigh” by John Everett Millais – Transferred from en.wikipedia; transfer was stated to be made by User:Mattis. Original uploader was Rednblu. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons.

Most spiritual and religious traditions have a corpus of stories which transmit their values and beliefs, and the stories of their saints and heroes. It is also good to create stories. In his essay, On Fairy Stories, JRR Tolkien expressed the view that when we create stories, we are exercising a gift from the Divine, the gift of ‘subcreation’.

One way of creating new stories is to practice storytelling in the round. One person starts off a story, and then when they have run out of ideas, the next person in the circle takes over. You can augment this practice by using cards with images or words to suggest ideas to the participants. 

Storytelling is an art which it is very satisfying to learn. To make your story come to life, include details of colour, taste, smell, sound and texture; imagine how the characters in the story feel about their situation.

Traditional storytelling does not go into much detail, but it gets across the experience with directness and immediacy.

You can also add your own personal twist to well-known stories, such as telling the story from the point of view of another character – how about the story of Little Red Riding Hood from the point of view of the wolf, for instance?

Try to find and listen to traditional storytellers and learn from their technique. 

Resources


This post was originally published on UK Spirituality.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s